Congress silent as Trump extends national emergency - because it’s to sanction Russian Federation

Congress silent as Trump extends national emergency - because it’s to sanction Russian Federation

Congress silent as Trump extends national emergency - because it’s to sanction Russian Federation

The Kentucky Republican's prediction arises as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) reportedly broke a promise to President Trump: McConnell promised to back the national emergency in exchange for Trump's endorsement of a long-term spending bill.

"Without question, the president's order for more wall money contradicts the will of Congress and will, in all likelihood, be struck down by the Supreme Court", Paul wrote. "If we take away those checks and balances, it's a unsafe thing".

Paul joins three other Republican senators in supporting the effort to stop the order: Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Susan Collins of ME and Thom Tillis of North Carolina.

Republican Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Thom Tillis of North Carolina and Susan Collins of ME are in the group of three.

This comes as Paul said he will join a group of three Republicans who have expressed concerns with Trump's declaration for a national emergency, saying they do not believe the president should be allowed to override Congress to such a degree Saturday.

Democrats argue there is no border emergency and that Trump is overreaching with his declaration given that the Constitution grants Congress the power of the purse strings.

In a FoxNews.com opinion piece, Paul says, "I support President Trump".

McConnell told reporters that he had hoped Trump "wouldn't take that particular path" of declaring a national emergency. If all the Democrats and the independents oppose Trump as expected, he would lose the vote on the emergency. If every Senate Democrat supports the legislation, the party would need four Republican votes to ensure the resolution passes.

That money would be tapped after the administration exhausts funding from other sources, including $1.375 billion provided by Congress; $2.5 billion from a Pentagon counter-drug account that the administration can access without an emergency declaration; and $601 million from a forfeiture fund in the Treasury Department.

That resolution will receive a vote in the Senate by the end of next week. "And the president doesn't get to decide that he can override Congress simply because Congress doesn't do what he wants".

Attempts to negotiate with Congress to obtain the $5.7 billion Trump had sought for more than 200 miles of steel barriers along the U.S. -Mexico border failed, resulting in the nation's longest-ever government shutdown. He also is invoking other powers to transfer an additional $3.1 billion to construction of a wall. But he announced, on February 15, an emergency declaration on the United States' southern border.

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