Regret sending that Facebook message? Now you can delete it

Regret sending that Facebook message? Now you can delete it

Regret sending that Facebook message? Now you can delete it

In April 2018, Facebook announced their intentions to roll out an "unsend" button and finally, the ability to delete messages has arrived worldwide.

To remove a message on Messenger, you have to just tap on the message you want to remove and select "Remove for Everyone".

Facebook now allows users to remove missent messages on its chat app Messenger.

Following the report, Facebook said it would publicly launch the feature to let users remove their messages from their chat history.

Facebook is now giving users a 10-minute window to delete messages after they've been sent. You can also choose to click "Remove for You", which means only the message will be deleted for you.

Last year, it was reported that some of Mark Zuckerburg's earlier messages to people had been disappearing from the recipients' inboxes.

We've all sent messages we regret, whether it's a typo, the wrong conversation or something a bit too below the belt. Instead of long-pressing on a sent message, click on the three-dot icon next to the message, followed by Remove.

The other option that will appear is "Remove for You", which only prevents you from seeing the message, but everyone else in the conversation can still view it.

"The last 15 years were about people building these new networks and starting to see their impact, then the next 15 years will be about people using their power to remake society", said Zuckerberg. Wondering how the feature works?

Even though Facebook has been under a wave of criticism over several issues during the past year, Zuckerberg claims that it would be a mistake to overlook the benefits of social media and emphasize on the 'negative aspects'.

Approximately 2.6 billion people use at least one of Facebook's messaging services - WhatsApp, Instagram, or Messenger - each month, and more than 2 billion people use it at least once a day. Florencia Herra-Vega, the CTO of encrypted messaging app Peerio, told Business Insider via message.

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