Wall St set to open lower on Trump tariff threat

Wall St set to open lower on Trump tariff threat

Wall St set to open lower on Trump tariff threat

Kudlow added that if the US doesn't get "satisfactory" responses to its trade positions more tariffs will be imposed.

Trump's remarks came just as the mood among investors had shown signs of brightening and Wall Street took heart from an upbeat holiday shopping period.

It has also lifted slightly to 63.96 euro cents, but jumped to 56.73 British pence. "They have to open up China to the United States".

A seemingly mixed message from the White House ahead of the G20 summit in Buenos Aires.

"And that wouldn't be a good thing".

"I think all of the issues that we have - on security issues, on arms control issues, on regional issues including the Middle East, I think that it will be a full agenda".

Just days before Chinese and American leaders are set to meet on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Argentina, the Chinese envoy to the United States issued an ominous warning against further escalation of the trade conflict that could potentially break the symbiosis of the two largest world economies, and entirely cripple global trade.

European markets opened subdued, but dipped as trading progressed, with the pan-European STOXX 600 benchmark last down 0.4 per cent, pulling back from a one-week high hit in the previous session.

US President Donald Trump says he is likely to go ahead with an increase on tariffs now imposed on Chinese goods at the start of 2019.

He also repeated his threat to slap tariffs on all remaining imports from China.

"Maybe. Maybe. Depends on what the rate is", Mr Trump said, referring to the possibility of tariffs on mobile phones and laptops, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The Trump administration has blasted Moscow's latest actions in Ukraine, a former Soviet republic, but the president himself has given a far lower key response.

'If we don't make a deal, then I'm going to put the $267 billion additional on, ' at a tariff rate of either 10 percent or 25 percent, Trump told the Journal.

Donald Trump has raised the stakes in the escalating global trade dispute between the US, China and some of America's traditional allies ahead of a major gathering of world leaders this week.

Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping are set to meet as early as Friday on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Argentina, and are also expected to have dinner on Saturday.

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