Florida Restores Voting Rights to More Than 1.4 Million Ex-Felons

Florida Restores Voting Rights to More Than 1.4 Million Ex-Felons

Florida Restores Voting Rights to More Than 1.4 Million Ex-Felons

He's also chair of Floridians for a Fair Democracy. "We are just ready to go forth and see greater things take place in the state of Florida". Most were drafted by state legislatures, but 64 resulted from citizen-initiated campaigns, including numerous most eye-catching proposals.

In 14 other states and Washington, D.C., they lose their rights only while incarcerated. The ballots in Missouri and Utah included proposals to legalize the medical use of pot.

A minimum wage increase was approved in two states. An Arkansas measure would raise the wage from $8.50 an hour to $11 by 2021; Missouri's would gradually raise the $7.85 minimum wage to $12 an hour.

Proposals to change the redistricting process so it's potentially less partisan were approved in Missouri, Colorado and MI. He was shocked to discover she had once been convicted of a felony and that it took 10 years for her to get her rights back. "It transcends the partisan divide", Neil Volz of the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition told NPR earlier this year.

Even as Congress forced southern states' hand with the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments, which freed slaves and gave them citizenship and the right to vote, Florida legislators laid the groundwork to disenfranchise those black residents.

Convicted sex offenders and those convicted of murder will not be allowed to register to vote.

In an e-mail to members, Poker Alliance president Mark Brenner said, "Amendment 3 will make it very hard - if not impossible - to expand gaming opportunities in Florida".

Its passage could reverberate beyond Florida into the 2020 presidential election due to the important role the state often plays in deciding close national elections, with a newly eligible 1.5 million voters coming into play.

Florida was one of 13 states where felons face a lifetime ban, need a governor's pardon or have to wait an additional amount of time in order to have their voting rights restored.

The target in MA was a 2016 law extending nondiscrimination protections to transgender people in their use of public accommodations. The ballot initiative came about after the Legislature failed to agree on gambling decisions in recent years - particularly in the House, which is more opposed to gambling than the Senate.

Across the U.S., a patchwork of laws impacts formerly incarcerated people from voting. OR adopted its "sanctuary state" law in 1987, becoming the first state to do so.

"It's pivotal because I think the culture around voting, especially in communities of color around here is very hostile", Aaron Sykes, community organizer, said. It needed 60 percent to pass. Private-industry tax experts hailed the ballot item as something that would benefit the economy as a whole, from businesses to consumers to schools to renters - especially those seeking affordable housing.

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