Democrats warn Trump after Attorney General Sessions forced out

Democrats warn Trump after Attorney General Sessions forced out

Democrats warn Trump after Attorney General Sessions forced out

Nothing provokes the anger of the fiery and unconventional president more than special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into whether his campaign colluded with Russian agents during his 2016 election.

Now, his chief of staff, Matthew Whitaker, 49, will fill in as Acting Attorney General. Whitaker criticized both aspects past year, and as he is now taking over oversight of the probe, he could try to strangle it, or even rescind Mueller's appointment.

He also once tweeted a prosecutor's opinion piece that described the Mueller team as a "lynch mob", and wrote his own op-ed saying Mueller would be outside his authority if he investigated Trump's family finances. "That's why Cabinet Secretaries have Deputies".

The timing for when a final report would be submitted by the special counsel's office is still unclear, and sources say there is also no clear timeline for when Mueller will wrap his investigation.

Justice Department rules on special counsels set boundaries on how Mueller could be removed.

He also said the line of succession within the Justice Department does not include the chief of staff and the fact that someone in that position would be made acting attorney general is "very odd". Sessions reportedly resigned at the request of the president.

Senior party officials have so far shied away from directly proposing the idea but have emphatically condemned the decision to fire Sessions and appoint Whitaker.

Mr Trump said: "According to NBC News, Voters Nationwide Disapprove of the so-called Mueller Investigation (46%) more than they Approve (41%)".

The news comes after Tuesday's midterm elections saw the Democrats take back the house, a blow to the president.

Schumer, in a separate press conference with reporters, warned that attempts by Sessions's successor or Trump to interfere with the investigation would spark a "constitutional crisis".

President Trump fired Jeff Sessions from his attorney general post yesterday.

Since stepping into his new role on Wednesday, Whitaker has faced questions - principally from Democrats - about whether he should recuse from the Russian Federation investigation, given that he has written opinion pieces in the past about the investigation, and is a friend and political ally of a witness.

Democratic Rep. Jerrold Nadler, who is expected to chair the House judiciary committee starting in January, said removing Sessions fit Trump's pattern of interfering in the work of the justice department and Mueller.

"The president is entitled to an attorney general he has faith in", he said. Or by re-assigning them back to their previous jobs in the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Justice Department or the intelligence community. On Wednesday, the president tweeted that "a permanent replacement will be nominated at a later date".

Sessions endured most of the name-calling in silence, though he did issue two public statements defending the department, including one in which he said he would serve "with integrity and honor" for as long as he was in the job.

An ever-more exasperated Trump ordered him to give up the mic and Acosta refused, with Trump branding him an "enemy of the people" and a "rude, awful person".

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