Brexit deal must be done within weeks, Raab warns

Brexit deal must be done within weeks, Raab warns

Brexit deal must be done within weeks, Raab warns

Labour, meanwhile, warned Mrs May that if she is hoping they will help pass her Brexit blueprint she can "think again".

"If it is 90 or 95 percent, if there's no solution for the Irish border, for our Parliament it's zero percent that is agreed for the moment".

But May's attempt to unlock the talks by considering an extension to a status-quo transition period beyond the current proposed end date of December 2021 has further stirred passions at home.

Taking the unusual step of briefing planned remarks to the Commons in advance, May will conclude that "taking all of this together, 95 per cent of the withdrawal agreement and its protocols are now settled" in talks that she has until now largely insisted on keeping secret.

The key bugbear, which has caused wide divisions in the ruling Conservative Party, has been the Northern Ireland-Irish border question.

The issue of the border between Northern Ireland, a part of the United Kingdom, and Ireland, an European Union member, remains a major stumbling block in negotiations over Britain's withdrawal from the bloc.

Amid the fevered talk, Raab also argued Sunday that an extended transition period would be "an alternative" to a so-called backstop agreement to keep either Northern Ireland or all of Britain in a customs union should the future trade talks end in deadlock.

Critics of May used Britain's Sunday newspapers to rhetorically savage the British leader, with unnamed rivals using phrases such as "assassination is in the air".

Speaking in the Commons after yet another weekend dominated by claims her time as Prime Minister is nearly up, May urged her MPs to focus on the national interest.

Restive Conservative backbenchers will meet on Wednesday night at a meeting of the 1922 Committee, which will be addressed by the party chair, Brandon Lewis. May held two conference calls with her cabinet ministers over the weekend in a bid to allay their concerns.

Andrew Mitchell - an ally of former Brexit secretary David Davis who is seen as a possible leadership contender - said a challenge to Mrs May would be a "mistake". The DUP had no immediate comment on the report.

Theresa May's government looks to be in its weakest position since losing its majority in the 2017 snap election, with cabinet members on the verge of revolt and backbench Conservative MPs turning up the rhetoric to increasingly violent levels.

Jack Blanchard for Politico writes that divisions over Brexit have turned the party into "a powder keg", with open talks of an imminent vote of no confidence against May, and "the feverish atmosphere led at least one MP to brief Sunday newspapers in, frankly, awful terms".

Britain is due to leave the European Union on March 29, but London and Brussels have not reached an agreement on their divorce terms and a smooth transition to a new relationship. "Instead, I ask myself what it means for you, for your family and for the whole of the United Kingdom", she wrote.

But Lamberts - who is on the European Parliament's Brexit Steering Group with five other MEPs including its chair, Guy Verhofstadt - claimed that this strategy was too risky as it could not guarantee there wouldn't be no deal.

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