Police pull migrants off buses amid caravan headed for US

Police pull migrants off buses amid caravan headed for US

Police pull migrants off buses amid caravan headed for US

This round of troops would be in addition to the 2,000 National Guardsmen stationed at the border under a previous Pentagon arrangement.

The official said roughly 800 soldiers will be sent to the area to offer "logistical support", including providing tents and vehicles.

In a tweet Thursday morning, President Donald Trump declared he would be "bringing out the military". I have alerted Border Patrol and Military that this is a National Emergy [sic]. On Monday, Trump said he had alerted the Border Patrol and the USA military that the migrant caravan was a national emergency.

"The troops retain the right of self-defense, but border patrol officers will still be the ones physically stopping illegal migration", the report noted.

Pentagon spokesman Navy Captain Bill Speaks said the Defense Department was now working with the Department of Homeland Security "to determine the specifics of our support" to border authorities.

President Trump wrote: "Sadly, it looks like Mexico's Police and Military are unable to stop the Caravan heading to the Southern Border of the United States".

In a second tweet, he added: "Every time you see a Caravan, or people illegally coming, or attempting to come, into our Country illegally, think of and blame the Democrats for not giving us the votes to change our pathetic Immigration Laws!"

The U.S. government's response has been to engage in utterly irresponsible fear mongering about the mostly poor women and children trudging north fleeing violence and poverty and looking for a better future.

Additionally, the United States is negotiating with Mexico about whether migrants from the caravan could be deported there, regardless of their country of origin.

Trump now says: "There's no proof of anything".

The number of people applying for asylum in Mexico has soared by more than 150 percent since Trump was elected president.

"They have lousy policy... they wanted that caravan and there are those that say that caravan didn't just happen".

"It's very unlikely that 10,000 people will arrive together at a border city between Mexico and the United States", he told a conference call with reporters.

The caravan is made up of people from Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras, but so far journalists have not encountered anyone from the Middle East, and a USA counter-terrorism official speaking to Reuters said claims of such haven't been corroborated.

Early Thursday, they set off from the town of Mapastepec in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas, moving on to the next stop in their long march north.

She left her two children back in Honduras and plans to get a job in the U.S.to send money back home so that her younger siblings and her children can afford to go to school.

Four days after crossing into Mexico, the caravan is more than 1,860 miles (3,000 km) from the U.S. border.

"It's hard, and we know this country is risky too, but back in Honduras it's even more unsafe, they kill for nothing", said Josena Anibal Mejia, 27, as he walked with his daughter.

The caravan, which began as a march of a few hundred people from the crime-wracked Honduran city of San Pedro Sula on October 13, swelled into the thousands as it was joined by migrants from El Salvador, Nicaragua and Guatemala.

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