Migrant Caravan Clash With Mexican Police, Break Down Border Fence

Migrant Caravan Clash With Mexican Police, Break Down Border Fence

Migrant Caravan Clash With Mexican Police, Break Down Border Fence

A caravan of Central Americans that formed in southern Mexico in late March also drew the ire of Trump, who on Thursday threatened to deploy the military and close the southern us border if Mexico did not halt the latest procession.

Early Thursday he tweeted: "I must, in the strongest of terms, ask Mexico to stop this onslaught - and if unable to do so I will call up the U.S. Military and CLOSE OUR SOUTHERN BORDER!" Indeed, some have already reached Mexico and requested asylum.

Several thousand Honduran migrants moved this week through Guatemala, and some were trying to cross to Mexico on Thursday, local media said.

The migrants say they organized for the long and hard journey on social media, but Washington suspects the group has been organized as a deliberate provocation.

The caravan of almost 3,000 people left San Pedro Sula in Honduras late last week, making its way through Guatemala's muddy jungle and residential streets to reach Mexico and, eventually, the United States.

Mexico's government has sought assistance from the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to help process migrants claiming refugee status, which could help it to disperse the caravan.

The thousands of Hondurans are making their way through Guatemala, headed toward Mexico and, if they're allowed through, plan to head onward to the US, as the contentious midterm elections approach November 6.

Trump's threats over immigration came a day before Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is due to travel to Mexico City for meetings with Mexican leaders.

And the president-elect, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, has pledged to issue work visas for Central Americans in a bid to retain workers in the area rather than seeing them moving to the US.

The migrants are generally fleeing poverty and insecurity in Honduras, where powerful street gangs rule their turf with brutal violence.

Migrants poured through Guatemalan border posts in the town of Tecun Uman and onto a bridge leading to Mexico, only to be halted by dozens of Mexican police in riot gear. Before the caravan reached the border, President Trump warned the immigrants that he would send the military to intervene.

Typically, when a person manages to sneak into the United States through Mexico - regardless of whether they were from Mexico or some point farther south - they're detained and housed in the United States until their case is decided.

Shortly afterwards, Guatemala's government tweeted that Mr Hernandez would meet Mr Morales today in Guatemala City to implement a strategy for returning the Honduran migrants.

However, as USA Today notes, it is "not entirely clear" what Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez can do to turn the migrants back now that they are on Guatemalan soil. He also suggested they are ready to welcome the migrants with open arms because they are likely to vote for them in elections. But as the numbers in the crowd surged, they pushed against the Mexico fence, even breaking the padlocks of the border gate.

Trump insisted that there were criminals in the group.

Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales told the Conference for Prosperity and Security in Central America last week that "not only have we arrested them within our territory, but they have been deported to their countries of origin".

He has urged the Republicans to make immigration a central issue of important Congressional elections which take place in the U.S. next month.

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