Nationwide test of presidential emergency alert system scheduled for Wednesday

Nationwide test of presidential emergency alert system scheduled for Wednesday

Nationwide test of presidential emergency alert system scheduled for Wednesday

Cellphone users can expect their phone to get the alert, along with "a loud tone and vibration" at 2:18 p.m.

What will be sent out Wednesday afternoon is just a test.

The WEA portion of the test is set for 1:18 p.m. CST and the EAS portion will follow at 1:20 p.m. CST. "No action is needed", officials said. The alert was initially scheduled to occur Thursday, September 20, but FEMA spokesman Mark Peterson tells CNN the test has been postponed, and October 3 was the alternate date for the test.

The MEMA website says that the system provides the president with the ability to communicate with the nation in times of a national emergency.

The text message is part of a test of the Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) and Emergency Alert System (EAS).

"The test is meant to ensure public safety officials have the methods and systems to deliver urgent warnings and alerts to the public in times of an emergency or disaster", said Acting Illinois Emergency Management Agency Director William Robertson. Users can't opt out of the presidential alert test, according to FEMA.

Johnson said the system will be used to notify US citizens of certain events of "national significance".

This will be the first national test of the Wireless Emergency Alert system, according to FEMA.

Aside from a few pertinent details about the alert (and the legalities supporting its existence), FEMA also released a mock-up image of what the message will look like on a smartphone.

The WEA system is used to warn the public about risky weather, missing children, and other critical situations through alerts on cell phones, according to FEMA. "No action is required".

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