Bezos: 'Secure and Confident' Trump Would be 'Glad' to be Scrutinized

Bezos: 'Secure and Confident' Trump Would be 'Glad' to be Scrutinized

Bezos: 'Secure and Confident' Trump Would be 'Glad' to be Scrutinized

Amazon chief Jeff Bezos is putting $2bn (£1.5bn) into a charitable fund he has established to help the homeless and set up a new network of schools.

His private ownership of The Washington Post, which has published articles critical of the White House, has also put him at odds with US President Donald Trump.

Earlier this month, US Senator Bernie Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist, proposed a bill in Congress called the "Stop BEZOS" Act, which would make large corporations pay workers more or pay for public assistance programs like Medicaid.

In brief: To say that Jeff Bezos has a lot of money is an understatement. Last year, Bezos said that he wanted to use philanthropy to help solve society's issues in the "here and now".

The other component, called the "Day 1 Academies Fund," will create "and operate a network of high-quality, full-scholarship, Montessori-inspired preschools in underserved communities", Bezos said.

But the Post reported earlier in the week that Amazon pledged that no HQ2 announcement would be forthcoming on Bezos' visit.

Mr Bezos, during a question and answer session at a dinner hosted by the Economic Club of Washington, said Mr Trump's attacks risk eroding protections and social norms important for democracy. "If you can give somebody a leg up when they're 2, 3 or 4 years old, by the time they get to kindergarten of first grade, they're much less likely to fall behind".

Asked about Trump's recent tweets critical of Amazon, Bezos said he doesn't need to defend his company, but would defend the Washington Post.

"But it is really unsafe to demonise the media". "It's risky to call the media lowlifes".

But the attacks on the press - while unsafe - aren't stronger than USA institutions, Bezos said. And while his new charitable endeavor should be applauded, many have noted that a number of his Amazon workers remain underpaid and endure hard working conditions.

"We're going to push through this", he added.

Even so, Amazon insisted it was "deeply committed" to tackling homelessness in Seattle and said it would continue to invest in local nonprofits that work with the homeless.

Bezos, who also owns The Washington Post and space exploration company Blue Origin, became the world's wealthiest person this year, with an estimated net worth of $164 billion, according to Bloomberg.

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