Trump praises North Korea for holding 70th anniversary parade without ICBMs

Trump praises North Korea for holding 70th anniversary parade without ICBMs

Trump praises North Korea for holding 70th anniversary parade without ICBMs

As North Korea displayed its military power in a show of force this weekend to mark the founding of the nation, in Japan, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, eyeing an historic extended term, reaffirmed his resolve to revise the nation's post-war, pacifist constitution and said he hoped his party could submit a proposal to parliament later this year.

The U.S.'s newly appointed special representative for North Korea, former Ford Motor Co. executive Steve Biegun, was due to arrive in the region Monday.

High-level talks and visits have continued but the most recent scheduled trip by US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was called off last minute and both sides have blamed each other for the stalling negotiations while insisting they're committed to the progress.

Mr Trump thanked "Chairman Kim" and said: "There is nothing like good dialogue from two people that like each other".

US and North Korean generals met Friday in the truce village of Panmunjom to discuss the next steps, a spokesman said, more than a month after 55 cases said to contain the remains of USA servicemembers were repatriated.

The guide said Kim Jung Un "appreciates lovely women and wants North Korean women to be the most handsome of all".

Washington is seeking the "final, fully verified denuclearisation of North Korea", while Pyongyang has only publicly affirmed its commitment to working towards the denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula, a euphemism open to interpretation on both sides.

Also, the chairs and benches where Kim Jong Un had sat are now encased in glass.

For worldwide consumption at least, Kim Jong-un's flagship "Byungjin" policy line, which focused on joint development of the economy and strategic weapons, has been watered down, with the focus now shifting to economic progress and downplaying the arms.

Soon after the Sunday celebrations end, Kim will once again meet in Pyongyang with South Korean President Moon Jae-in to discuss ways to break the impasse over his nuclear weapons.

Despite no agreement yet between Pyongyang and Washington on the denuclearization process the two agreed to at their landmark Singapore summit in June, and with Pyongyang demanding the USA agree to a peace treaty to end the 1950-53 Korean War, there have, over the last week, been some encouraging signals.

A North Korea expert has launched an astonishing attack on Donald Trump, attacking his "repugnant grovelling" before Kim Jong-un and saying that Pyongyang will never give up its nuclear weapons.

But given what we have seen in the past few days, the emphasis has been far more on economic development, science and technology, and modernization.

The North Korean leader presided at the parade but did not deliver a speech there and authorities opted not to display any intercontinental or medium-range ballistic missiles among the military hardware in the procession.

Another major theme was the reunification of the Korean Peninsula, carved into two by the Soviet Union and the United States after World War II.

The North did show off a battery of big artillery pieces known as self-propelled guns that could be used to threaten Seoul, South Korea's capital.

According to foreign journalists who... "Unification is the only way Koreans can survive", said an editorial in North Korea's party newspaper Rodong Sinmun.

Participants perform during the Arirang Mass Games in Pyongyang, North Korea, Sept. 9, 2018.

And South Korean President Moon Jae-in was slated to travel to Pyongyang on September 18 for the first such trip in 11 years.

The mass games performances are expected to continue for the next month or so, with tickets for foreigners starting at just over $100 and going up to more than $800 per seat.

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