Did Trump's latest tweet cross a legal line for obstruction of justice?

Did Trump's latest tweet cross a legal line for obstruction of justice?

Did Trump's latest tweet cross a legal line for obstruction of justice?

The Kremlin has denied reaching out to a Moscow-based property developer and his son who arranged a meeting between a Russian lawyer and Donald Trump Jr.to discuss allegedly compromising information about Hillary Clinton.

Taking to Twitter to complain about the ongoing Russian Federation investigation, Trump said Sessions "should stop this Rigged Witch Hunt right now, before it continues to stain our country any further".

In a reference to the special prosecutor who is heading-up the Russian Federation probe, the president added: "Bob Mueller is totally conflicted, and his 17 Angry Democracts that are doing his dirty work are a disgrace to the US!"

Mueller, a former Federal Bureau of Investigation director, is investigating whether the Trump camgain aided or abetted an attempt by Russian Federation to sway the 2016 presidential election, or tried to cover up the conspiracy.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders Mr Trump's comments were simply the president "fighting back". "It's the president's opinion".

The Trump legal team is open to Mueller interviewing Trump with questions related to "an area of collusion, not obstruction", Giuliani said on Monday.

Some legal analysts said Wednesday's tweet alone was not enough to bring an obstruction of justice charge but it could be used to establish a pattern of conduct revealing Trump's intentions.

Trump has repeatedly denied that his campaign colluded with Russian Federation. He adds, "Shockingly, the act called for is an illegal one, since Sessions [is] forbidden under federal ethics law from doing what Trump wants". But Trump, flustered by the probe, is reportedly pushing his team to keep negotiating under the belief he can clear himself of wrongdoing in an interview.

Trump's personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, said that in his tweet Trump was expressing an opinion long espoused by his team.

But Manafort's involvement in the Trump campaign spanned six months, and he led efforts to secure the GOP nomination for Trump in 2016. Trump has repeatedly blasted the probe as a "witch hunt", but the call for Sessions to intervene represents another escalation.

The difficulty in trying to use Trump's tweet to prove obstruction is that he may have posted it for several reasons, including to rally support among his political base, said Jennifer Rodgers, a former federal prosecutor in NY who now lectures at Columbia Law School.

The president's tweets on Wednesday were greeted warily on Capitol Hill, with most lawmakers, regardless of party, urging Trump to let the probe run its course.

"It's not a secret: I think he'd like to kill the Mueller investigation any way he can, but I hope this country and particularly its representatives will not follow that", she said.

Trump echoed his lawyer's argument on Twitter.

"Just because @realDonaldTrump obstructs justice in full public view by calling on Sessions to interfere in Mueller investigation doesn't mean it's not obstruction of justice. I don't think there's any reasonable view of this tweet that could be construed that way".

Trump said last summer he would have chosen a different attorney general had he known Sessions would recuse himself from supervising the investigation of election interference. He suggested that Democrats' perceived detachment from working and middle class Americans' hardships reinforces the mounting impression that only Trump and the Republican Party speak for the downtrodden and left-behind.

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