Fifth boy brought out of Thai Cave

Fifth boy brought out of Thai Cave

Fifth boy brought out of Thai Cave

Although weak, the boys are largely in good health.

The boys, aged between 11 and 16, went missing with their 25-year-old coach after football practice on June 23.

It could take two to four days complete the mission, officials said.

Narongsak Osottanakorn, the rescue mission chief, said that the same divers who carried out the operation yesterday are also involved in the second phase, along with additional personnel. As of Monday morning, nine people remained trapped in the cave, including the team's coach.

Around that time, an ambulance left the cave area and headed toward a helicopter, which landed at a nearby hospital.

Authorities have been tightlipped about the progress of Monday's operation.

Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha plans to host a thank-you party for all the rescue teams, Mr Narongsak said. Seven boys remain trapped inside with their coach.

Paramedics with a stretcher believed to be carrying one of the boys from the soccer team in Chiang Rai on Sunday.

Divers have resumed operations to bring out the remaining members of the group. "Hooyah", the Thai Navy SEALS wrote on their Facebook page Monday, referring to the boys' soccer team, the Wild Boars.

It was not clear who was inside the ambulance or the helicopter.

The second evacuation attempt started at 11 a.m. local time (midnight ET) after rescue workers got some rest and refilled supplies.

Thailand's Health Secretary said last week that on arrival at the hospital the boys would need to be quarantined for one to two days before being allowed to see their families. "We can't visit our boys in hospital because they need to be monitored for 48 hours", Somboon told Reuters.

The fate of the boys and their coach has gripped Thailand and drawn global media attention.

Authorities had said that incoming monsoon rains that could send water levels in the cave rising, coupled with falling oxygen levels in the enclosed space, added to the urgency of getting those trapped out. It takes the divers about eight hours to get into the cave, reach the boys, and bring them back out.

The urgent and unsafe effort has involved the boys diving through the cave's tight and twisting passages, guided by experienced divers.

Eight boys have now been extracted.

It was not immediately clear Monday how the overnight rains had impacted water levels inside the flooded cave.

Meanwhile, Thailand's weather department said there was a 60 percent chance of rain on Monday with thunderstorms forecast throughout the week.

Regarding Sunday's rescue, Narongsak said earlier Monday that the healthiest boys were removed first.

Even tech billionaire Elon Musk has been lending a helping hand. If the tests are successful, the sub would be placed on a 17-hour flight to Thailand.

A short official video released by the rescue operation late on Sunday showed four ambulances with their lights flashing driving up the muddy dirt track that leads to the cave complex.

The most unsafe part of the journey out of the labyrinth cave system is the first kilometer, during which they are required to squeeze through a narrow flooded channel.

They were guided by expert divers who plotted the hours-long escape through more than four kilometres (2.5 miles) of twisting passageways and flooded chambers.

A spokesman for Musk's Boring Co. said Sunday that the company has four engineers who are "offering support in any way the [Thailand] government deems useful". They are then taken to hospital in Chiang Rai.

Family members of the boys trapped in the cave are questioned by the media.

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