Ministerial will signal keeping Iran N-deal: Wang

Ministerial will signal keeping Iran N-deal: Wang

Ministerial will signal keeping Iran N-deal: Wang

When he announced that the United States would withdraw from the JCPOA in May, President Donald Trump observed that since the deal was implemented, Iran's military budget grew by 40% and its "bloody ambitions have grown even more brazen".

Britain, France and Germany along with Russian Federation and China met with Iran in Vienna to offer economic benefits and assurances that would lessen the blow of sweeping US sanctions announced by Trump.

Talks to save the 2015 nuclear deal on Friday are unlikely to satisfy Iran, European powers said, and Tehran warned that it could leave the accord if it was not fully compensated for the re-imposition of USA sanctions.

But in a setback on the eve of the talks, Iran s President Hassan Rouhani told French President Emmanuel Macron that European economic measures now on offer did not go far enough.

Washington has warned other countries to end trade and investment in Iran and stop buying its oil by early November or face punitive measures.

Iran has proved that its nuclear activities have always been peaceful, Rouhani said, referring to the IAEA reports issued following the signing of the 2015 landmark nuclear deal, known officially as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA).

And Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said the meeting would "send a united and determined signal" to the world that the other parties "will continue to respect the agreement".

"The Iranians expect the others to say what we are going to do to keep the deal alive".

Their foreign ministers were holding talks in Vienna, where the accord was signed in 2015 with the aim of stopping Iran from building the atomic bomb in return for sanctions relief that promised greater trade and investment for the country.

"SWIFT is the key but Iran has to stay in at least until the end of the year to maintain divisions between the European Union and U.S., keep some credibility and try and survive amidst forthcoming sanctions", said Sanam Vakil, Associate Fellow at Chatham House, a London-based global think tank.

In the joint statement, Zarif and other top diplomats reconfirmed their commitment to the deal and its "economic dividends" for Iran, which has suffered worsening financial turbulence since Trump abandoned the accord.

Since Trump s announcement, Iran s rial currency has fallen, prices have risen and the country has been hit by street protests and strikes.

The new round of diplomacy has been clouded after security services said they had foiled an alleged plot to bomb a Paris rally by an exiled Iranian opposition group, the People s Mujahedeen of Iran. "We expect a clear action plan from Europe with a timetable so it can compensate for the USA exit from the deal".

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