Researchers uncover Anne Frank's 'dirty jokes' in diary

Researchers uncover Anne Frank's 'dirty jokes' in diary

Researchers uncover Anne Frank's 'dirty jokes' in diary

The pages contain four "dirty jokes" and an explanation of sex, contraception and prostitution, the ABC reports, which were covered with gummed pieces of brown paper when the diary was first found - presumably Anne's attempt to hide her risqué writing from her family.

The 13-year-old scribbled the pages on September 28, 1942 - less than three months after she and her family went into hiding from the Nazis in the secret annex of an Amsterdam home. But the institution did share some of what it says were 33 lines about sex education and prostitution also on the pages. "At the end she explicitly names her father, Otto, who had been in Paris and saw houses with prostitutes", the Anne Frank Housewrites.

"I sometimes imagine that someone might come to me and ask me to inform him about sexual matters", Anne Frank wrote on the pages."How would I go about it?" Later, researchers realized the underlying text was partly visible and modern software could probably decipher it.

Frank Van Vree, director of the Netherlands Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, said the jokes are of the sort that are "classics among growing children".

Anne Frank House director Ronald Leopold said the pages were not really scandalous or surprising, as Frank openly discusses her sexual maturation elsewhere in the diary.

He said the jokes "make it clear that Anne, with all her gifts, was above all also an ordinary girl".

VIDEO: Anne Frank Though German Jewish teenager Anne Frank did not survive the Holocaust, the memoirs from her two years in hiding live on forever.

"The only element that might be interesting from the point of view about her development as a writer and as a teenager is the fact that she's creating, kind of, fiction" he said.

Researchers were at pains to point out that it is not the first time that Frank wrote about sex in her diary.

Anne then attempts to explain sex to an imaginary person, using the information she's learnt from her father, a friend and books. Because Frank's diaries are so susceptible to damage, they typically only get inspected once every 10 years and those doing the job avoid touching the pages, according to the New York Times.

Miss Frank and her sister died in camp, when she was just 15.

Related news