Facebook suspends 200 apps over possible data misuse

Facebook suspends 200 apps over possible data misuse

Facebook suspends 200 apps over possible data misuse

Mr Archibong said Facebook would "show people if they or their friends installed an app that misused data before 2015" at this website, but affected users would not be able to claw that information back. Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook announced that the investigation began in March itself and since then they looked into thousands of apps and suspended 200 of them.

We also don't know what criteria Facebook will use to determine whether a company is in violation of its policies, or how extensive each individual examination will be.

The company also released confidential agreements signed with Cambridge academic Aleksandr Kogan and whistle-blower Christopher Wylie, requiring the deletion of Facebook users' data gathered by Dr Kogan's company GSR. Another app, called "myPersonality" has now been revealed to have disclosed "intimate" details of at least three million Facebook users.

Kogan had established Global Science Research (GSR), which was granted access to Twitter data. Companies like Twitter tend to have access to less private information than Facebook.

A report by the New Scientist reveals yet another leak that affects data of over 3 million users that was "left exposed online for anyone to access" for over four years!

Facebook is once again at the center of a scandal over data mining on its platform, after it was discovered that another personality quiz hosted on the social network harvested the personal information of some three million people. Each Facebook user was given a unique ID that pulled together data including their age, gender, location, status updates, results on the personality quiz and more.

"We've received strong feedback from regulators and judicial systems outside of Europe that they want us to be directly responsive to them and not be required to go through Europe on data protection matters", Facebook said. As we've written about, the more data you string together, the less time it takes to correlate it all to the point of being able to strip away anonymity. The app is now under investigation for potentially having violated the platform's policies due to the language used in the app and on its website to describe its data-sharing practices. In fact, the University of Cambridge told New Scientist that it was alerted to the issues surrounding myPersonality by the ICO. A Cambridge Analytica spokesperson said the company used Twitter for political advertising but insisted that it had never "undertaken a project with GSR focusing on Twitter data and Cambridge Analytica has never received Twitter data from GSR".

The people behind the data sets were David Stillwell and Michal Kosinski at the University of Cambridge's The Psychometrics Centre.

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